Sweet Confessions of a Mature Body Builder by Barbara Cerda

 

Muscle moving under smooth skin shiny with pearls of sweat always accompany those pleasurable hours of hard workouts. Let us speak truth about the maddening rush of endorphins that plague our loins during hyperactivity. Bodybuilding and wired workouts serve to be a time of meditation that relaxes the spirit and feeds the libido. Not everyone seeks to find his or her meditative centers in serene stillness. Many of us discover it when developing taunt bodies and smooth curves. They come as an added bonus.

There are memories of times when applying earnest effort in learning proper running. The esthetics of pure form and the often-obligatory spiritual poets’ readings at the end of a five miler never offer up the same pleasure. Circuit training often included a couple of miles of running between heavy lifting. But alas, it was the sheer pleasure of muscle pumping that brought the spiritual center back…that relaxed the body for sensual exploration and freed the mind.

In monitoring the progress of physical form resulting from bodybuilding, we are often led to the shadowy depths of hedonism. It does not lessen over time nor bow before wisdom. We are drawn to the mirror as if a deer caught in headlamps. Gazing at sinews now visible will produce smiles of appreciation. Body flexing takes on a new meaning. It becomes addictive. Once in training mode no day passes no meal eaten without thought of how long too the exertion and what foods to consume, all to recall the pleasure of it.

“Endorphins (“endogenous morphine”) are endogenous opioid inhibitoryneuropeptides.” – Wikipedia

Liberated by a gland in the Central Nervous System called the Pituitary, endorphins flood the blood stream during mental stimulation producing the feeling of euphoria. The release of endorphins enhances the collection of feelings that saturates our senses during moments of sexual excitement. It originates inside us.The same opioid affect our bodies during meditation and for some it surges while participating in extreme sport.

Most importantly, it also calms the system, regulates the beats of our hearts and stirs the loins – preparing them for blissful release. So muscle stimulation is not only healthful it is necessary to growth and maintenance of the body. As the surface of the skin releases moisture for cooling, the brain begins to listen to the mind while promoting beauty.

Throughout our lives, sinew remembers. Muscle cells do not dissolve during a body’s maturation – they merely flatten from lack of use and nourishment. When we stress, allow debilitating thoughts or anger in defense the brain orders the liver to liberate fat cells. Filled with water and lipid fats they are voracious. They settle under the skin and roam our arteries. With shackled minds and low spirits, we diminish our production of endorphins.

However, when reawakened matured muscles cells spring once more to life.

They proudly retake their position. Supreme and efficient strong sinew forces life changes. Only strong physical activity, high quality protein and an active mind keep a beautiful muscled body happy. Training young or mature muscle is the quickest way to sensual beauty.

With time, the sweet confession of being a maturing body builder becomes a pleasure.

The Motives Behind the Lack of fitness in Our Healthcare Part 1 by Barbara Cerda

 

The OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) has empirically argued that those countries where women are attaining an equal voice in legislature are leading the charge in creating a higher quality of life and healthcare reformation.

As the strongest economy on the globe, the United States is falling far behind in the war for better wellbeing. Could this failure be partially due to the United States Congress, which is comprised of 19% women out of the 535 membership?

The United States has a life expectancy gap in relation to other OECD countries. Yet we consistently tout the wellness of our current healthcare system. While it fails to address the needs and cut public funding, for the most underserved…women and children.

Amongst many in leadership, there’s a dismissal in how women can play a significant role in how healthcare providers tailor wellbeing. That path to gender fluid legislature is arduous and complicated, pebbled by male centric sovereign politics. We find ourselves part of a third world economic dysfunction when we elect few women in our legislative bodies. Alleviating this societal injury is necessary to bringing about true healthcare parity.

One country has taken great strides toward gender equality in its government, Finland.

This nation boasts a healthy 38% of female presence in its parliament and leads the world in healthcare reform. It is by far more empathetic to the needs of women and children.

Elected in 2000, Tarja Halonen was Finland’s first elected woman to the office of president. Serving in office for two terms, her legacy was to achieve a successful balanced economy.  An important part of this responsible fiscal reconstruction was the reformation of their health care system.

Envisioning a robust, value driven and cost effective medical system, President Halonen embraced the principals outlined in a Harvard business thesis, “Redefining Health Care: Creating Value-Based Competition on Results”. The Harvard team of Michael Porter and Elizabeth Olmsted Teisberg authors the study. The book illustrates how most purveyors of private healthcare have failed to deliver a system of value-based care.

Normal economic ideology dictates that aggressive competition in private sector business results in a lowering of prices and an increase in the value of that service. Private and governmental run healthcare agencies in the U.S. are the costliest in the world and supply the poorest quality in its deliverance of care. Finland‘s success in providing gender parity in a valued based healthcare system, is attributed to a strong percentage of women in parliament; a healthy 38 percent.

In 2007, the United States spent $7,290 per capita for an inadequate healthcare system. This number is a staggering two and a half times the average of OECD countries. The OECD places an average of per capita healthcare expenditures at $2,984. The CIA World Factbook has ranked the Unites States 41 in infant mortality rates and 46th for total life expectancy.

This rate of infant mortality defines a healthcare system that fails to provide adequate means of preventive medicine. Poor prenatal care results in low birth weights and bleak infant survivability. What does this say about the future of our economy the future of our country?